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The Great Food Drive for Children - Four Moissons Join Forces to Feed Children 0-5 Years Old

More than 17,000 children between the ages of 0 and 5 suffer from food insecurity in Montreal, Laval, Montérégie, and the Eastern Townships. From April 12th to 26th, the Great Food Drive for Children (GFDC) is aiming to collect food for community agencies working in this wide region.


We need food for babies and young children

"Our operating model is based on food recovery and only 1% of the donations are food and other products for infants. With a campaign like the GFDC we want to tell the companies that manufacture or market these products to think of us," explains Richard D. Daneau, executive director of Moisson Montréal.


This spring, the campaign's goal is to collect 100,000 kg of food that will be distributed to nearly 200 organizations helping children aged 0 to 5. Founded in 2012 and led by Moisson Montréal, the GFDC takes place in partnership with Moisson Rive-Sud, le Centre de bénévolat et moisson Laval, and Moisson Estrie.


A balanced diet has an impact on brain growth

Josiane Cyr, perinatal and early childhood nutritionist, reminds us that foods should be introduced at around 6 months because, at this age, the baby's need for calories and nutrients increases.


"A varied and balanced diet is essential from an early age because the needs related to the growth and development of the brain are very high. Nutritional deficiencies can affect the development of the child, especially that of the brain," explains the nutritionist.


In addition, an inadequate diet can also lead to obesity and related diseases, such as type 2 diabetes. The onset of these diseases at a young age can predispose the child to chronic diseases later in life. Read the attached document on the role of nutrition in child development.


Support from strong partners: Maxi and Abbott

"Great partners are already committed to helping us meet the challenge of increasing our distribution of products for the very young. Moisson Montréal is happy to be able to count on Maxi's loyalty and Abbott's new commitment to fight against food insecurity," says Richard D. Daneau proudly.


"Maxi is a loyal partner of the Moissons and it is with great pride that my team is involved again this year in the Great Food Drive for Children by pledging to donate 125 pallets, or five trucks full of food and essential products for children aged 0 to 5. This is a particularly vulnerable clientele and this campaign is essential to support their development and help them get a good start in life," said Patrick Blanchette, vice-president, Maxi.


To donate: www.granderecolte.com/en.html


THE ROLE OF NUTRITION IN CHILD DEVELOPMENT: SOME FACTS


By Josiane Cyr, perinatal and early childhood nutritionist

  • Foods should be introduced at around 6 months of age because of the baby's need for an increase in calories and nutrients.

  • Iron is particularly important because, at around 6 months, the iron stores that a baby had at birth are usually depleted and must now be replenished by food. Iron deficiency can lead to anemia. We know that anemia can have an impact on cognitive development, and this impact could be irreversible and follow the child throughout his or her life. Indeed, studies have shown that children who were anemic at a young age have more difficulty in pursuing their education, getting a job, and finding a spouse once they have reached adulthood.

  • A varied and balanced diet is important from an early age because the needs related to the growth and development of the brain are very high. Nutritional deficiencies can affect a child's development, especially that of the brain.

  • An inadequate diet can lead to obesity and related diseases, such as type 2 diabetes. The onset of these diseases at a young age can predispose the child to chronic diseases later in life.

  • Access to quality, unprocessed foods provides children with a diet that is higher in nutrients. Because children have small stomachs, the content of their meals should provide as much nutritional value as possible. Having parents cook at home helps children learn healthy eating habits.

SOURCE MOISSON MONTREAL


Related Links

http://www.moissonmontreal.org/