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Social media platforms advertising ducklings for sale: what the duck?

Updated: Jun 13


image courtesy of unsplash.com

UPDATE: The duck predicament on the West Island may be more widespread than we previously anticipated. A quick Kijiji search brings any naïve internet browser to a plethora of advertisements selling “adorable” ducklings for startlingly reasonable prices.


It’s the perfect concoction for any young and impressionable victim. With captions like “WOW, caneton, baby duck, duckling” and a price of only 15$, local teens and tweens are falling victim to what for some West Islanders has become an absolute nightmare.


Remember, Tracy thought she was doing a good thing by letting her daughter take on the responsibility of a pet duck. Little did she know her daughter would be painfully allergic. Furthermore, upon investigation, the duck was a domestic breed, which meant sanctuaries like Le Nichoir are unable to take it in. If that weren’t enough, don’t forget it’s not even legal to keep a duck as a pet in Montreal.


To read the full story, continue below.



A local mom is urging fellow West-Islanders to be cautious and attentive when it comes to the ads their children are viewing on social media and with their friends at school. Although warnings of predators, explicit content, and other internet dangers may be your first thought, this West Island mom has a different grievance she is warning her fellow community members about.


When Tracy (who has chosen to remain anonymous) got a text from her 12-year-old daughter at school, she didn’t think much of it. In today’s world, sending texts with updates, information, and requests throughout the school day is commonplace. The last thing on Tracy’s radar was a duck.


Tracy’s daughter and her friends came across an ad online selling ducklings in the area, and instantly the girls were hooked.


Tracy’s husband was the most reluctant of the family to the request but after careful convincing, and demonstration of maturity and responsibility on their daughter’s behalf, the couple obliged to her appeal.


In a few short days, it became perfectly evident that a West Island home was no place for a duck. And what could possibly make the already unideal situation even worse, you might ask? Allergies. Tracy’s daughter who’d originally been smitten by the duckling was now suffering from a reaction to their new pet.


It became clear rather quickly, that despite growing attached to the duckling, Tracy and her family wouldn’t be able to keep their waterfowl friend.


Rehoming him would prove to be no easy feat. As Tracy did more research into the duckling and contacted several rescues and services in the area, she learned that it was in fact a domestic breed of duck, which meant that sanctuaries and rehabilitation centers like Le Nichoir would not be able to take the animal in. Because institutions like Le Nichoir deal with the rehabilitation of wild species, they cannot take in domestic breeds as it would be harmful to all animals involved.


To make matters worse, experts at Le Nichoir noticed that the duckling had already attached itself to Tracy and began treating her as its mother.


Now, you may be asking yourself, “Is that even legal?” And the answer is no. It is actually not legal to keep a duck as a pet in Montreal.


The takeaway? Consider Tracy’s story as a warning and as a lesson. Popular social media apps like Snapchat and TikTok show young teenagers taking their pet ducks for walks on a leash, or getting them a glass of water at the Starbucks drive-through. You never know the kinds of things your children may come across online. It is always better to air on the side of caution and ask important questions before bringing a stranger into your home. Even if that stranger has feathers.